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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the positive side, again, hurricane sandy appears not to have been the job killer many had feared. the labor department says the havoc wrought by sandy had no substantial impact on the unemployment picture. with us now, jill schlessinger, editor at la w manyre the jobs aart me ,ow m t are seasonal jobs? >> not so many seasonal. we saw some broad based gains and we continue to see some really robust gains in retail, in business services, health care is really continuing to show great improvement. you mentioned manufacturing. mentioned one other area, 20,000 jobs lost in construction. that may be a little bit of sandy related. >> but also, one of the interesting things, you looked at the numbers and said there was 300,000 people that said weather did affect the job surge. why is that not considered sandy related? >> it is weird because there are two different surveys when you look at these jobs numbers. one comes from the businesses. the businesses, they take that survey, november 12th, and the businesses are for the job creation number. the other survey is called a household survey. that's h
than expected in the wake of hurricane sandy and fiscal cliff anxiety. >> so it looks like sandy will not affect the numbers even after revisions. >> reporter: georgetown's harry holzer, former chief economist for the labor department. >> in terms of the fiscal cliff, so far we are not seeing any big impact. >> reporter: not even an impact on retail which, for all the talk of online supplanting bricks-and-mortar buying, added 53,000 jobs last month-- much of it holiday hiring, no doubt-- but a healthy 140,000 overall increase in the past three months. not all the new numbers were festive, however. construction shed 20,000 jobs, though perhaps influenced by sandy. manufacturing dropped 7,000. grinchier still, job growth in september and october was revised down by 49,000 jobs. and for all the talk of a lower unemployment rate, its explanation seemed to be that several hundred thousand more americans stopped looking for work in november and were counted out of the labor force. again, economist holtzer. >> this month's change was driven completely by the fact some people stopped loo
in emergency aid for superstorm sandy recovery. that request falls short of total damage estimates. governors from new york, new jersey and connecticut alone say they will need closer to 82 billion to fix their states. >>> we don't know their names, but a couple from a phoenix suburb has presented the second winning ticket from last month's massive powerball drawing. the couple came forward now because they were concerned about, guess what, the looming fiscal cliff. they will take home 192 million bucks before taxes, and the plan is to use the money to start a foundation and support their favorite charities. >>> more people out of work, and another recession. you want to know what's at the bottom of that fiscal cliff, well, there you have it. many say that what's going to happen if something isn't done soon, but guess what? alice rivlin has a plan. she's a senior fellow at the brookings institution and served as director of the white house office of management and budget, the omb, under president clinton. alice, good morning. >> good morning. >> nice to have you here on the show this morning.
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)

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